Eric Libby bio photo

Eric Libby

Research fellow at the Sante Fe Institute studying the evolution of biological complexity

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My research focuses on the evolution of biological complexity– particularly the origins of multicellularity, life cycles, development, cooperation, and organizational scales. Essentially, I am interested in how simple organisms evolve into complex ones. This topic is not only fascinating but it is fundamental to understanding the evolution and ecology of life– both on earth and elsewhere in the “verse”.

— NEWS —

  • 8/05/16: Presenting poster “The Influence of Genetic Architecture and Mutation Hot Spots on Evolutionary Predictability” at ASM Experimental Evolution.

  • 8/02/16: Giving talk at IAL8 Lichens in Deep Time conference entitled “Is a lichen an evolutionary individual”.

  • 7/15/16: We posted our paper with adaptive networks and voting paradoxes called “Strategic tradeoffs in competitor dynamics on adaptive networks” on arXiv

  • 6/21/16: Gave talk at Evolution conference entitled “Predicting life’s tape”. There were lots of great talks and it was fun hearing what was going on in the field.

  • 6/15/16: Posted “Programmed cell death can increase the efficacy of microbial bet-hedging” to bioRxiv. With cell death and bet-hedging it is like Russian roulette with microbes.

  • 5/18/16: “Time-dependent fitness effects can drive bet-hedging populations extinct” article with Will Ratcliff posted to bioRxiv.

  • 4/26/16: Gave a colloquium on “The Evolution of New Kinds of Individuals” as part of the University of Arizona’s quantitative biology colloquium series. Loved meeting with faculty and students to talk about the great research going on at U of A.

  • 4/7/16: Finished 72 hours of science #72hoursofscience with a successful upload to the arXiv Dynamics of beneficial epidemics! It is such an honor working with my fantastic colleagues at SFI.

  • 3/30/16: Our paper “Differences in epigenetic information between cells promotes the evolution of a germline” was just accepted at Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B !

  • 3/25/16: There’s now an extracurricular section on this webpage featuring posts about some of my other interests. The first post describes a preserved algae dish that is tasty with a heavy dose of umami.

  • 3/10/16: Our paper “Stabilizing Multicellularity Through Ratcheting” was just accepted at Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B !